Joe, Kevin, and Toren take a look at looking, including how vision works, and the “supervision” of tetrachromacy. Then the amazing eyes of the animal kingdom, including giant squid and the mantis shrimp, plus the full-body “eye” of the Ophiocoma Wendtii, visual defects like floaters, non-24-hour-sleep-wake-disorder, surfer’s eye, and Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

Music: “I Just Can’t See For Looking” by Nat King Cole

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Series Navigation<< Touch, Part 2 of 2Sight, Part 2 of 2 >>
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  • You know, the “Marky Bark” character on season 4 of Arrested Development has face blindness, resulting in much hilarity.

  • Patrick

    Great episode guys!

    This guy was in an accident and had brain damage to the route from his occipital cortex to his amygdala and could not recognize familiar people by looking at them, believing them to be imposters. They could, however, recognize them by listening to them over the phone. They call it the Caprgas Delusion.

  • Brenton

    What happens at 0:58 of the Macropinna video? Some weird underwater laboratory appears, something sneaks in and is whisked away?

  • Taylor

    I haven’t seen a 48 fps movie in theaters, but I have experienced it on the web. Rocket Jump’s popular “video game high school” (VGHS) claims to be the first web series to incorporate both 24fps and 48fps sequences- When ever the characters are portrayed being “in” a video game, the scenes run at 48ps. The directors wanted that unreal sensation many people describe when seeing this new format to help portray that the characters are in an alternate reality.

    If you haven’t seen 48fps videos before, I recommend you check out the opening scene of Season 2 episode 1 on their site (youtube doesn’t support 48fps), http://www.rocketjump.com

    When I first saw it, I felt as though the video was stuck on fast-forward, but strangely the lip sync matched the audio.

  • Derek

    A nice little TED-ed video on the evolution of the eye:

    http://www.sciencealert.com/watch-here-s-how-eyes-evolved-500-million-years-ago