Guest Dr. Rob Tarzwell talks bloodletting, transfusions gone wrong, toxic shock, hemophilia, ebola, polycythemia, lymphoma and other blood disorders. Also, frozen heads made of blood and the Zero G Period!

Music: “Heartaches” Ted Weems

Images

Videos

Movies
Carrie
Kevin: 7/10
Toren: 7/10

Blade
Kevin: 8/10
Toren: 6/10
Joe: 7/10

The Shining
Kevin: 10/10
Toren: 8/10
Joe: 8/10

The Abominable Dr Phibes
Kevin: 1/10
Toren: 4/10

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Showing 13 comments
  • amanda

    Found this when I googled it.. maybe you found it too, I just paused the podcast because I was curious… There was a few ppl saying the ‘philia’ in this case means ‘tendency’ but I like this other explanation better:

    “Remember that medical terms often refer to what the body does, not what the person does. Joe the hemophiliac doesn’t “like to” bleed. But his body does.”

  • amanda

    Found this when I googled it.. maybe you found it too, I just paused the podcast because I was curious… There was a few ppl saying the ‘philia’ in this case means ‘tendency’ but I like this other explanation better:

    “Remember that medical terms often refer to what the body does, not what the person does. Joe the hemophiliac doesn’t “like to” bleed. But his body does.”

  • banks!

    I didn’t hear an answer in the podcast so I am posting it here…

    The ABO blood group system is widely credited to have been discovered by the Austrian scientist Karl Landsteiner, who found three different blood types in 1900 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1930 for his work.

    Due to inadequate communication at the time it was subsequently found that Czech serologist Jan Janský had independently pioneered the classification of human blood into four groups but Landsteiner’s independent discovery had been accepted by the scientific world while Janský remained in relative obscurity. Janský’s classification is however still used in Russia and states of former USSR .

  • She Fights Like A Girl

    Hey fellas. Regarding anime and drops, the red/blood drop is lusty, and the clear/sweat drop is embarrassment.

    Aroused:
    http://static.funnyjunk.com/pictures/450e8e7a_a303_d9970.jpg

    Embarrassed:
    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2280/2416838878_73753019fb.jpg?v=0

    Note: The blood drop/nosebleed also applies to girlies. 🙂

  • She Fights Like A Girl

    Hey fellas. Regarding anime and drops, the red/blood drop is lusty, and the clear/sweat drop is embarrassment.

    Aroused:
    http://static.funnyjunk.com/pictures/450e8e7a_a303_d9970.jpg

    Embarrassed:
    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2280/2416838878_73753019fb.jpg?v=0

    Note: The blood drop/nosebleed also applies to girlies. 🙂

  • Decinces

    The Addams Family – Sweet Oblivion http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0Lu_CBRLnM

    Pugsley and Wednesday are performing a scene from a play where they end up cutting each other and spraying the audience with fake blood… lots and lots of fake blood 🙂

  • Dr Rob

    Correction: There are no lymph nodes in your brain!

    Not sure what the hell I was talking about. The general job of the lymph nodes is to carry the plasma which gets squeezed out of the blood vessels in the capillary beds by hydrostatic and oncotic pressure (pressure across semi-permeable membranes from the difference in concentration of solutes – kinda like how eating salty food makes you really thirsty).

    In your brain, plasma becomes cerebrospinal fluid, produced by the choroid plexus, a structure deep within the brain. This flows through the ventricles, down the spinal chord, and back up around the outside of the brain, ultimately being reabsorbed by the arachnoid granulations.

    My apologies!

    Nevertheless, you can get lymphoma of the brain, since B-cells are found throughout the body, and cancerous proliferations of B-cells within the brain are, unfortunately, a well known site.

  • Amanda Attrill

    On behalf of all woman , I am thankful Kevin knows about Periods now.

  • Amanda Attrill

    On behalf of all woman , I am thankful Kevin knows about Periods now.

  • Sirik

    Seems there is a new process being explored that can turn all blood to type o.
    Pretty neat.

    http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2008/03/24/conversion_makes_all_blood_type_o/

  • Amy

    Ok, commenting on old episodes as I relisten to them. You never talked about Renfield’s syndrome. Are you saving it for a Vampirism episode? It is a minor topic, and the actual described incidence rate is tiny, but it just seems like a topic right up your(pl.) alley (alley’s?).

  • Amy

    Ok, commenting on old episodes as I relisten to them. You never talked about Renfield’s syndrome. Are you saving it for a Vampirism episode? It is a minor topic, and the actual described incidence rate is tiny, but it just seems like a topic right up your(pl.) alley (alley’s?).

  • sezary

    I hate to be a nag about this (and also, wow this is 2000 and late)- but Type AB blood doesn’t have “no antigens” so it can receive anything, it has both A and B antigens, it just lacks the antibodies against A and B antigens. This is why AB individuals can receive everything. O on the other hand, lacks A and B antigens (but has increased amounts of H antigen… but that’s another story hello Bombay phenotype!), which is why it can go to everybody.

    It’s the naturally occurring antibodies that are what cause the major incompatibilities between the blood types. Type A has anti-B, so if they’re given B or AB blood, badness will happen. Type B has anti-A, so if they’re given A or AB blood, badness happens. Type O has both anti-A AND anti-O, so if they’re given A, B, or AB blood, badness happens.

    Also, the ABO blood group is one of many blood groups besides the Rhesus blood group (RhD pos. vs RhD neg.). Kell, Duffy, Kidd, Lewis, MNS, and P are all blood groups that can cause transfusion reactions to occur if somebody who develops an antibody to antigens in any of those groups, if they receive blood that is positive for one of those antigens, so much badness will happen.

    I could go on and on and talk about Hemolytic Disease of of the Fetus and Newborn, but I shall stop there (which involves the whole Rh pos vs Rh neg thing and why Rhogam exists).

    Blood is mah business and this is tl;dr.